Roasted Tomatoes

Want to punch up the flavor in your next pizza or pasta? Try adding roasted tomatoes! They're deliciously chewy & tart with an irresistible umami flavor.

Roasted tomatoes

Have you ever tried roasted tomatoes? If you haven’t, I’m here to tell you that you have to make this roasted tomato recipe before summer ends. While I love using juicy fresh tomatoes in recipes like pico de gallo, Caprese salad, and panzanella, roasted tomatoes transform into something totally different. As they roast, they lose moisture, and their flavor intensifies. They come out of the oven chewy & tart, with a super-concentrated, intense umami flavor. These little guys are totally irresistible!

Make sure you roast a big batch – you’ll find endless ways to use them. Around here, we can’t get enough of them on pizza, in pasta, or on their own straight out of the oven!

Roasted tomatoes recipe ingredients

How to Roast Tomatoes

Luckily, making oven-roasted tomatoes couldn’t be easier. All you need is olive oil, salt, and tomatoes. When you’re choosing tomato varieties, choose small to medium-sized ones. I especially like to roast cherry tomatoes, but grape tomatoes, or plum tomatoes work too. The hardest part is waiting for them to cook! Here’s how to roast them:

  1. Preheat the oven to 250 degrees, and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Slice the tomatoes in half, and place them with their cut sides up in a single layer on the baking sheet.
  3. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt, and transfer the baking dish to the oven. Roast the tomatoes until they’re shriveled and browned around the edges. That’s it!

Roasted tomatoes recipe

At 250 degrees, my cherry tomatoes took about 4 hours to get totally shriveled and brown around the edges. The time will vary depending on the size and juiciness of your tomatoes – roasted grape tomatoes can take as little as an hour, while larger tomatoes will need longer.

Roasted cherry tomatoes

When I have time to let them cook, I love to do a really long, slow roast like this. But some days, I don’t have all afternoon to make roasted tomatoes. When I’m in a hurry, I roast them at 300 degrees to help them cook faster, or I’ll start at 250 and turn up the heat to 350 partway through, once the tomatoes have begun to wilt down. They come out great just the same! Just be sure not to start with too high a temperature – if the oven is too hot, the tomatoes will burst, not shrivel.

How to roast tomatoes

What To Do With Oven Roasted Tomatoes

With their concentrated umami flavor, roasted tomatoes are an excellent addition to pastas, salads, soups, tomato sauce, and more! Here are some of my favorite ways to use them:

How do you like to use roasted tomatoes? Let me know in the comments!

Roasted Tomatoes

If you love these oven roasted tomatoes…

Try roasted red peppers, cauliflower, asparagus, beets, butternut squash, or delicata squash next!

5.0 from 1 reviews

Roasted Tomatoes

 
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Roasted tomatoes are the easiest way to add flavor to summer pizzas, pastas, and more! Note that your cooking time will depend on the size and juiciness of your tomatoes. Be sure to roast until they're shriveled and brown around the edges!
Author:
Recipe type: Component
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 3 cups cherry tomatoes, halved
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • fresh thyme, optional
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 250°F and line a large baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Place the cherry tomatoes cut side up on the baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and fresh thyme, if using.
  3. Roast the tomatoes until they’re well shriveled around the edges, 2½ to 3 hours. The time will vary depending on the size and water content of your tomatoes.
Notes
Note: to speed up the process, I often turn up my oven to 300 or 350 halfway through the roasting time. This allows the tomatoes to begin to dehydrate and then continue to roast. Too high of a temperature too early will cause them to burst instead of shrivel.

9 comments

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  1. blythe
    08.12.2019

    What is the best way to store these and how long will they stay good?

    • Jeanine Donofrio
      08.12.2019

      Hi Blythe, I store them in a glass storage container in the fridge for about 3 to 5 days.

  2. Donna
    08.13.2019

    Great, easy recipe that I will be using but without the oil as that is a no-go zone for me medically.
    Your pictures on this one are gasp-inducing! Truly stunning and worthy of hanging proudly on any kitchen or eatery wall. The combination of colours really make them sing!
    Are your photos ever made available for purchase?
    Keep doing what you are doing. You inspire people to eat in new ways every day! Than-q! You are appreciated! XO

  3. Sabrina from newkitchenlife.com
    08.13.2019

    great idea to get more flavor out of my tomatoes, thank you

  4. Anita from finance.uonbi.ac.ke
    08.14.2019

    Wow, this makes it way easier than sun drying them, thanks.

  5. Christine
    08.14.2019

    I just made this and I will be lucky if any of these will make it into the frig for later. Super yummy! Thanks for the easy and delicious recipe.

    I let mine get more brown than what you pictured above.

    Thanks again!

    • Jeanine Donofrio
      08.18.2019

      Hi Christine, I’m so glad you loved them!

  6. Catherine
    08.18.2019

    Have a batch in the oven right now. Make them every weekend in summertime until no longer available. I pack them into 1/2 pint jars, fill with olive oil and freeze. I use them all winter in pastas, soups, you name it. 3 pints of tomatoes yields about 2 half pint jars.
    A kitchen staple.

    • Jeanine Donofrio
      08.18.2019

      ooh, I’d love to have these stashed in my freezer for winter – thanks for the tips!

A food blog with fresh, zesty recipes.
Photograph of Jeanine Donofrio and Jack Mathews in their kitchen

Hello, we're Jeanine and Jack.

We love to eat, travel, cook, and eat some more! We create & photograph vegetarian recipes from our home in Chicago, while our shiba pups eat the kale stems that fall on the kitchen floor.