How to Cut a Pomegranate

Learn how to cut a pomegranate like a pro! Plus, find delicious pomegranate recipes to showcase this vibrant, juicy, feel-good fruit.

Pomegranate seeds in a bowl

Who else loves pomegranates?! As soon as these vibrant, ruby red fruits appear at the grocery store each fall, Jack and I start eating them like crazy. We can’t get enough of their sweet/tart flavor and their juicy, bursty texture. I sprinkle the seeds over desserts, salads, and even dips, while Jack eats them by the spoonful as a snack!

But…how do you cut a pomegranate fruit, anyway? If you’re asking that question right now, you’re not alone. Learning how to cut a pomegranate can seem intimidating, and done the wrong way, it can be a huge mess. Not to worry! Below, you’ll find a step-by-step guide for how to cut open and de-seed a pomegranate. This method is super simple, and better yet, it won’t leave your counter covered in pomegranate juice!

How to cut a pomegranate

How to Cut a Pomegranate

Ready to cut open a pomegranate? Here’s what you need to do:

First, use a sharp knife to cut off the top of the pomegranate. I like to trim away about 1/4 inch.

Segmented fruit on a cutting board

Then, score the sides of the pomegranate. Holding the fruit, you might notice that there are 5-6 gentle ridges in its surface. Use your knife to make thin slits along those ridges. You should be cutting along the fruit’s white pith, not slicing open any of the arils. After you make the cuts, use your hands to peel the fruit open and gently divide it into segments.

Hands submerging segmented pomegranate in bowl of water

Next, fill a large bowl with water. Submerge the segments, and use your hands to remove the seeds from the skin and membranes. The seeds will sink to the bottom of the bowl, while the white, spongy membranes will float to the top. Skim off the white bits, and drain the seeds. That’s it!

Pomegranate seeds in bowl of water

How to Eat a Pomegranate

Now you know how to cut a pomegranate, but what about how to eat it? If you’re like Jack, you’ll enjoy eating pomegranate seeds on their own. They’re a fun, sweet/tart, and juicy snack, with a delicious crunch in the middle from the seeds. If you’re like me, you’ll want to experiment with different pomegranate recipes. Here are a few of my favorites:

  • Overnight oats – The ruby red seeds add anti-inflammatory power to morning oats. I love them on hot oatmeal too!
  • Baked Brie – The seeds create a sweet, crunchy topping for the melty cheese.
  • Butternut Squash Hummus – The arils’ sweet/tart flavor tastes fantastic with the warm spices in this fall dip.
  • Stuffed Acorn Squash – I use the arils as a colorful garnish, making this recipe fit for a holiday feast.
  • Butternut Squash Salad, Wild Rice Salad, and Harvest Salad with Cider Dressing – Can you tell that I love pomegranates in salads? They add bright pops of flavor to these sweet and savory autumn recipes.
  • Tahini Cookies – I top chewy, cardamom-spiced cookies with the bursty seeds. A perfect holiday treat!

Let me know what recipes you try!

Pomegranate seeds

More Produce Basics

Loved learning how to cut a pomegranate? Check out one of these produce tutorials next:

How to Cut a Pomegranate

rate this recipe:
5 from 4 votes
Prep Time: 20 mins
Serves 8
This is my favorite way to cut a pomegranate! See the blog post above for pomegranate recipe suggestions.

Ingredients

  • 1 pomegranate
  • large bowl of water

Instructions

  • Use a sharp knife to cut the top of the pomegranate, about 1/4 inch.
  • Score the sides of the pomegranate. Holding the fruit, you might notice that there are 5-6 gentle ridges in its surface. Use your knife to make thin slits along those ridges. You should be cutting along the fruit's white pith, not slicing open any of the arils. After you make the cuts, use your hands to peel the fruit open and gently divide it into segments.
  • Fill a large bowl with water. Submerge the segments, and use your hands to remove the seeds from the skin and membranes.
  • The seeds will sink to the bottom of the bowl, while the white, spongy membranes will float to the top. Skim off the white bits, and drain the seeds.

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A food blog with fresh, zesty recipes.
Photograph of Jeanine Donofrio and Jack Mathews in their kitchen

Hello, we're Jeanine and Jack.

We love to eat, travel, cook, and eat some more! We create & photograph vegetarian recipes from our home in Chicago, while our shiba pups eat the kale stems that fall on the kitchen floor.